Time to pick up the kid from the school bus

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I would just like to say that today has gone by too fast. This week has gone by too fast.

I would also like to say that I’m not looking forward to my evening run in the still-cold, still-blowing, still-flecked-with-occasional-snowflakes springtime. At least it will be light.

After saying those things, I would like to confess that a pleasure of mine this week has been re-reading blog posts from last winter, when Juliet was being launched, with all of the excitement and busyness that surrounded that time. I note that we had lilacs budding and lettuce growing in March last year! I note also that we were “cooking with the kids” regularly, and that we had guests over much more often. The difference between then and now, aside from the weather, is an uptick in our evening activities. AppleApple swims three evenings a week, and practices soccer three evenings a week (sometimes back-to-back on the same evening), while Albus and Kevin are out two or three evenings a week, too. I can safely say that supper is disrupted five out of five weeknights. AppleApple can go all week without getting a hot meal. (And I haven’t even mentioned the weekend activities.)

Next up, the season of weekend soccer tournaments, with two kids now involved in rep play.

As always, the balance is so imperfect. Forget balance, I think. Live life where you’re at, so long as it’s working for you. So I’m appreciating the dog walks with the little kids in the evenings, and I’m thankful that my mom comes to help out when we’re going in the several different directions all at once.

I’m also happy to be reading almost every night to the kids. We are now into one of my favourite Laura Ingalls Wilder books: On the Banks of Plum Creek. It’s structured in such a quietly dramatic way: the borrowing to build the new house, the debt, the wheat, the hope, the plague of grasshoppers. The kids were solemn as I read last night about the glittering cloud of grasshoppers that descended and ate every green thing there was to eat. “But that’s their food! And they have the debt!” said CJ. I’m not convinced he’s got the concept of debt down, but you never know. He was really worried about it.

We were all solemn, thinking of the enormity of the loss for this family. And yet, the mother responds with gentleness, not grief. “We’ve gotten by before, and we will again.”

It made me feel utterly spoiled for choice. What do I have to complain about?

Oh, but how could Ma be so patient?

“At least they can eat the prairie chickens!”

But that whole garden lost, and the plums on Plum Creek, and the wheat … and the debt. Could I bear to wait and wait in hope as they must?

But I’ve run out of time, completely! Must race to get to the bus stop before CJ gets off.

Five-year-old's birthday party with friends: album
Life in fast-forward

3 Comments

  1. I can never decide whether I admire Ma or not. She keeps me going sometimes. WWMD*

    * What Would Ma Do?

    Reply
  2. I have a theory that Ma was only patient through the blurry lens hindsight and creative license.

    Reply
  3. Susan — LOL!
    On the Banks of Plum Creek is one of my favourites! Gosh, it’s been ages since I read those — my girls weren’t interested after the first couple. I can still remember the tedium of The Long Winter — something I guess I should remind myself these days while I’m whining.

    Reply

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