A happy birthday

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taken last night: still six!

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six, plus dogs

It’s funny, but Kevin and I have both been experiencing similar feelings of vague anxiety since the arrival of the doggies on Monday. It reminded me of something — but what? And then I realized. It reminded me of having a baby, and everything that gets stirred up in the aftermath of the birth.

Excitement is one of the emotions, of course.

But as new parents, each time, we wondered how we would cope, would we know what to do, how would our routines need to change, would we be able to meet everyone’s demands, and how could we return our family’s life to equilibrium? (Patience, patience, patience is the answer, of course.)

Seven years ago today, right about now in fact (around 2pm), I gave birth to our second daughter, and third child. She was born in hospital due to complications (our only child born at the hospital), but the birth was much like my other births: quick, once it got going.

If she’d been a boy, we would have named her Walter.

We stayed long enough to eat a meal in hospital, then drove home. All of four blocks. Four blocks of me panicking in the backseat beside my precious brand-new baby girl who looked entirely too small to be strapped into a carseat. We hadn’t had to make that hospital-to-home trip before.

The recovery was relatively easy, in retrospect, without medical complications. She was an easy baby; our easiest, it must be said. Loved to eat. Slept well. Unfussy. Happy in her sling. Big toothless grins, and a beautiful bald head. I remember taking the three kids grocery shopping when she would have been no more than a week and a half old. In other words, we coped. We did just fine. And soon, we were well on our way to being comfortable as a family of five.

But there’s no doubt that Kevin and I both felt overwhelmed in the days following her birth.

And I’m feeling that — in much smaller doses — with the arrival of our two dogs. How will this change our routines? Will they fit in? What are their quirks and unexpected behaviors? How do we all fit together?

As I type, both are napping in my office, looking about as content as a pair of dogs could look. I went for a swim this morning, and was surprised by how happy I was to see them when I got home. (They were happy to see me too, and nothing beats being greeted by living creatures thrilled to mark one’s arrival.)

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now she is seven

Today is a birthday, a special day for our family, and especially for one little (big) newly seven-year-old girl. She started the morning by opening presents. After opening each one, she gave spontaneous heart-felt hugs to her siblings. She requested that her last-night-of-being-six photo include the dogs. She is a loving soul who sometimes gets squeezed by her position in the middle and has to demand attention. We didn’t time the arrival of the dogs to coincide with her birthday, but I think they’re bringing out good things in her: love, and care, and thoughtfulness.

We’re looking forward to a party tonight to celebrate our girl. On the menu (her request): homemade pizzas, and a cake that is being baked and frosted even now with help from a wonderful babysitter.

Kevin and I will figure this out, again. I’m sure.

Happy birthday, Fooster.

Dogs in the house
Tales from the party

3 Comments

  1. She is so pretty! Happy birthday!

    Reply
  2. Your description of Fooey as a baby reminds me of my third. And I agree with Tricia, she has such a lovely face. Happy happy day!

    When reading about the new dogs, I snorted to myself at one point and thought “at least you don’t have to breast feed them!” so just keep that in mind when feeling anxious–it could be much more difficult!

    Reply
    • Yup! No breastfeeding going on here. Actually, it’s been pretty smooth. And I like how much they love my office. As soon as I come in here, both race in to join in, curl up in their chosen spots, and start snoring.

      Still, it caught me by surprise to feel so off-balance by the change.

      Reply

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